Monday, April 21, 2014

Ιστορικό.Πώς η Κάθρην άνοιξε το δρόμο συμμετοχής των γυναικών στο Μαραθώνιο

In celebration of today's Boston Marathon, we're sharing the dramatic story of the first woman to officially run the historic race. Kathrine Switzer's experience is a revealing illustration of the barriers that trailblazing women athletes had to overcome and of how far girls and women in sports have come in only a few decades. 

In 1967, Switzer was a 20-year-old college student at Syracuse University when she registered for the race using her initials, K.V. Switzer. Not realizing that she was a woman, who were barred from participating in the Boston Marathon for over 70 years, race officials issued her an entry number.

During the race, marathon official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove Switzer from the marathon after discovering she was female. Other runners, including Switzer’s boyfriend Tom Miller, blocked Semple and she was able to complete the marathon. Pictures of the incident and the story of Switzer’s participation in the marathon made global headlines.

After the marathon, Switzer became deeply engaged in efforts to increase girls’ and women’s access to sports and she and other women runners finally convinced the Boston Athletic Association to drop their discriminatory policies and allow women to participate in 1972. By 2011, nearly 43 percent of Boston Marathon entrants were female. Switzer also helped lead the drive for the inclusion of a women’s marathon in the Olympic Games -- a victory which was achieved at long last with the first women's marathon at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

To read more about Kathrine Switzer's inspirational story, we recommend her autobiography, "Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports," which you can find at http://amzn.to/1o1607x

To watch a wonderful short Makers interview with Switzer about her experiences breaking barriers in women’s sports, visit http://bit.ly/1jj4pJX

For an excellent resource for teaching tweens and teens about the history of Title IX -- the landmark 1972 U.S. civil rights legislation which opened up many athletic opportunities for girls by prohibiting gender discrimination in educational activities --we highly recommend "Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX: The Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America" for ages 11 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/let-me-play

To inspire your children with the stories of more female sports trailblazers, visit our “Sports / Games” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/sports-games

For more stories of both real-life and fictional girls and women confronting sexism and prejudice in a multitude of forms, visit our "Gender Discrimination" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/social-issues/prejudice-discrimination?cat=69

And, if your Mighty Girl loves sports, check out our collection of girl-empowering t-shirts and select 'sports' from the left menu at http://www.amightygirl.com/clothing
Με αφορμή τον σημερινό εορτασμό του Μαραθώνιου της Βοστώνης, μοιραζόμαστε τη δραματική ιστορία της  πρώτης γυναίκας  να τρέξει επίσημα την ιστορική κούρσα. Η Switzer' είναι μια αποκαλυπτική εικόνα των εμποδίων που πρωτοπόροι αθλήτριες έπρεπε να ξεπεραστούν και σε ποιο βαθμό τα κορίτσια και οι γυναίκες στον αθλητισμό έχουν προχωρησει σε λίγες μόνο δεκαετίες. Το 1967, η Κάθρην, ήταν μια 20-χρονη  φοιτήτρια κολεγίου στις Συρακούσες Univerμιο όταν ειχε εγγραφεί για τον αγώνα χρησιμοποιώντας τα αρχικά της, KV. Switzer(Ελβετία). Οι οργανωτές δεν συνειδητοποιούν ότι ήταν μια γυναίκα, οι οποίες είχαν αποκλειστεί από τη συμμετοχή στο Μαραθώνιο της Βοστώνης για πάνω από 70 χρόνια. Έτσι οι ιθύνοντες της κούρσας εξέδωσαν αριθμό συμμετοχής. Κατά τη διάρκεια του αγώνα, ο υπεύθυνος του Μαραθώνιου Jock Semple επιχείρησε να απομακρύνει φυσικά την Κάθρην από το μαραθώνιο μετά την ανακάλυψη ότι ήταν θηλυκό. Άλλοι δρομείς, όμως,συμπεριλαμβανομένου  και του φίλου της Tom Miller, μπλοκάρουν τον  Semple και έτσι,κατάφερε να ολοκληρώσει το μαραθώνιο. Εικόνες από το περιστατικό και την ιστορία της συμμετοχής της Κατερίνας, στο μαραθώνιο γίνονται  παγκόσμια πρωτοσέλιδα. Μετά τον μαραθώνιο, η Switzer's έμεινε βαθιά προσηλωμένη στις προσπάθειες για την αύξηση της πρόσβασης των κοριτσιών και των γυναικών στον αθλητισμό και αυτή και άλλες γυναίκες δρομείς τελικά έπεισαν το Boston Athletic Association για να καταργήσει τις διακρίσεις  τους και να επιτρέψουν στις γυναίκες να συμμετέχουν το 1972. Μέχρι το 2011 σχεδόν το 43 τοις εκατό των συμμετεχόντων στο Μαραθώνιο της Βοστώνης ήταν γυναίκες. Η Κ.Σ. βοήθησε επίσης να  για την ένταξη της μαραθώνιο των γυναικών στους Ολυμπιακούς Αγώνες -. Μια νίκη που επιτεύχθηκε επιτέλους με το μαραθώνιο των πρώτων γυναικών στους Ολυμπιακούς Αγώνες του 1984 στο Λος Άντζελες για να διαβάσετε περισσότερα για την εμπνευσμένη ιστορία Kathrine Ελβετία,  συστήνουμε την αυτοβιογραφία της, «Μαραθώνιος Γυναίκα: Εκτέλεση του αγώνα να φέρουν επανάσταση των γυναικών Sports", το οποίο μπορείτε να βρείτε στοhttp://amzn.to/1o1607x να παρακολουθήσετε μια υπέροχη μικρή Makers συνέντευξη με την Κατερινα για τις εμπειρίες της το σπάσιμο των φραγμών σε γυναικεία αθλήματα, επισκεφθείτε http://bit.ly/1jj4pJX Για μια άριστη πηγή πληροφοριών για τη διδασκαλία tweens και οι έφηβοι για την ιστορία του τίτλου IX - το ορόσημο του 1972 η αμερικανική νομοθεσία πολιτικά δικαιώματα που άνοιξαν πολλά αθλητικά ευκαιρίες για τα κορίτσια από την απαγόρευση των διακρίσεων λόγω φύλου στις εκπαιδευτικές δραστηριότητες - -το συνιστούμε ανεπιφύλακτα "Let Me Play: Η ιστορία του τίτλου IX: Ο νόμος που άλλαξε το μέλλον των κοριτσιών στην Αμερική" για τις ηλικίες 11 και άνω .

Διαβάστε το ίδιο θέμα στην Αγγλική,όπως την βρήκαμε στο ΦΒ της



What a bastard. Well done her!
In celebration of today's Boston Marathon, we're sharing the dramatic story of the first woman to officially run the historic race. Kathrine Switzer's experience is a revealing illustration of the barriers that trailblazing women athletes had to overcome and of how far girls and women in sports have come in only a few decades. 

In 1967, Switzer was a 20-year-old college student at Syracuse University when she registered for the race using her initials, K.V. Switzer. Not realizing that she was a woman, who were barred from participating in the Boston Marathon for over 70 years, race officials issued her an entry number.

During the race, marathon official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove Switzer from the marathon after discovering she was female. Other runners, including Switzer’s boyfriend Tom Miller, blocked Semple and she was able to complete the marathon. Pictures of the incident and the story of Switzer’s participation in the marathon made global headlines.

After the marathon, Switzer became deeply engaged in efforts to increase girls’ and women’s access to sports and she and other women runners finally convinced the Boston Athletic Association to drop their discriminatory policies and allow women to participate in 1972. By 2011, nearly 43 percent of Boston Marathon entrants were female. Switzer also helped lead the drive for the inclusion of a women’s marathon in the Olympic Games -- a victory which was achieved at long last with the first women's marathon at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

To read more about Kathrine Switzer's inspirational story, we recommend her autobiography, "Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports," which you can find at http://amzn.to/1o1607x

To watch a wonderful short Makers interview with Switzer about her experiences breaking barriers in women’s sports, visit http://bit.ly/1jj4pJX

For an excellent resource for teaching tweens and teens about the history of Title IX -- the landmark 1972 U.S. civil rights legislation which opened up many athletic opportunities for girls by prohibiting gender discrimination in educational activities --we highly recommend "Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX: The Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America" for ages 11 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/let-me-play

To inspire your children with the stories of more female sports trailblazers, visit our “Sports / Games” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/sports-games

For more stories of both real-life and fictional girls and women confronting sexism and prejudice in a multitude of forms, visit our "Gender Discrimination" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/social-issues/prejudice-discrimination?cat=69

And, if your Mighty Girl loves sports, check out our collection of girl-empowering t-shirts and select 'sports' from the left menu at http://www.amightygirl.com/clothing
In celebration of today's Boston Marathon, we're sharing the dramatic story of the first woman to officially run the historic race. Kathrine Switzer's experience is a revealing illustration of the barriers that trailblazing women athletes had to overcome and of how far girls and women in sports have come in only a few decades.
In 1967, Switzer was a 20-year-old college student at Syracuse University when she registered for the race using her initials, K.V. Switzer. Not realizing that she was a woman, who were barred from participating in the Boston Marathon for over 70 years, race officials issued her an entry number.
During the race, marathon official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove Switzer from the marathon after discovering she was female. Other runners, including Switzer’s boyfriend Tom Miller, blocked Semple and she was able to complete the marathon. Pictures of the incident and the story of Switzer’s participation in the marathon made global headlines.
After the marathon, Switzer became deeply engaged in efforts to increase girls’ and women’s access to sports and she and other women runners finally convinced the Boston Athletic Association to drop their discriminatory policies and allow women to participate in 1972. By 2011, nearly 43 percent of Boston Marathon entrants were female. Switzer also helped lead the drive for the inclusion of a women’s marathon in the Olympic Games -- a victory which was achieved at long last with the first women's marathon at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.
To read more about Kathrine Switzer's inspirational story, we recommend her autobiography, "Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports," which you can find at http://amzn.to/1o1607x
To watch a wonderful short Makers interview with Switzer about her experiences breaking barriers in women’s sports, visit http://bit.ly/1jj4pJX
For an excellent resource for teaching tweens and teens about the history of Title IX -- the landmark 1972 U.S. civil rights legislation which opened up many athletic opportunities for girls by prohibiting gender discrimination in educational activities --we highly recommend "Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX: The Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America" for ages 11 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/let-me-play
To inspire your children with the stories of more female sports trailblazers, visit our “Sports / Games” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/sports-games
For more stories of both real-life and fictional girls and women confronting sexism and prejudice in a multitude of forms, visit our "Gender Discrimination" section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/books/social-issues/prejudice-discrimination?cat=69
And, if your Mighty Girl loves sports, check out our collection of girl-empowering t-shirts and select 'sports' from the left menu at http://www.amightygirl.com/clothing
www.amightygirl.com/

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